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Non-small cell lung cancer

Polymorphisms in mitotic checkpoint-related genes can influence survival outcomes of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.
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Polymorphisms in mitotic checkpoint-related genes can influence survival outcomes of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

Oncotarget. 2017 Jun 27;:

Authors: Kang HG, Yoo SS, Choi JE, Hong MJ, Do SK, Jin CC, Kim S, Lee WK, Choi SH, Lee SY, Kim HJ, Lee SY, Lee J, Cha SI, Kim CH, Seok Y, Lee E, Cho S, Jheon S, Park JY

Abstract
This study was conducted to investigate the association between variants in mitotic checkpoint-related genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 766 patients with NSCLC who underwent curative surgery were enrolled. Among the 73 variants evaluated, 4 variants were related with survival outcomes. BUB3 rs7897156C>T was associated with worse overall survival under a recessive model (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.58, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.33, P = 0.02). AURKB rs1059476G>A was associated with better overall survival under a recessive model (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.41-0.99, P = 0.05). PTTG1 rs1895320T>C and RAD21 rs1374297C>G were associated with worse disease-free survival. In the functional study, relative luciferase activity was higher at the BUB3 rs7897156T allele compared to that at the C allele. Western blot showed that the phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR in the AURKB variant-type (M298) was significantly lower than in the AURKB wild-type (T298). We found that 4 variants of mitotic checkpoint-related genes were associated with survival outcomes in patients with surgically resected NSCLC. Particularly, our results suggest that BUB3 rs7897156C>T and AURKB rs1059476G>A are functional variants.

PMID: 28700337 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]