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Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

Oxalate-curcumin-based probe for micro- and macroimaging of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer's disease.
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Oxalate-curcumin-based probe for micro- and macroimaging of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer's disease.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Nov 06;:

Authors: Yang J, Zhang X, Yuan P, Yang J, Xu Y, Grutzendler J, Shao Y, Moore A, Ran C

Abstract
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disorder that has a progression that is closely associated with oxidative stress. It has long been speculated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in AD brains is much higher than that in healthy brains. However, evidence from living beings is scarce. Inspired by the "chemistry of glow stick," we designed a near-IR fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probe, termed CRANAD-61, for sensing ROS to provide evidence at micro- and macrolevels. In CRANAD-61, an oxalate moiety was utilized to react with ROS and to consequentially produce wavelength shifting. Our in vitro data showed that CRANAD-61 was highly sensitive and rapidly responsive to various ROS. On reacting with ROS, its excitation and emission wavelengths significantly shifted to short wavelengths, and this shifting could be harnessed for dual-color two-photon imaging and transformative NIRF imaging. In this report, we showed that CRANAD-61 could be used to identify "active" amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) surrounded by high ROS levels with two-photon imaging (microlevel) and to provide relative total ROS concentrations in AD brains via whole-brain NIRF imaging (macrolevel). Lastly, we showed that age-related increases in ROS levels in AD brains could be monitored with our NIRF imaging method. We believe that our imaging with CRANAD-61 could provide evidence of ROS at micro- and macrolevels and could be used for monitoring ROS changes under various AD pathological conditions and during drug treatment.

PMID: 29109280 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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