Close
Close

Distal renal tubular acidosis

Pediatric Sjogren syndrome with distal renal tubular acidosis and autoimmune hypothyroidism: an uncommon association.
Related Articles

Pediatric Sjogren syndrome with distal renal tubular acidosis and autoimmune hypothyroidism: an uncommon association.

CEN Case Rep. 2015 Nov;4(2):200-205

Authors: Agarwal A, Kumar P, Gupta N

Abstract
A 14-year-old female came with the history of sudden onset weakness; during work up, she was found to have hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap and normal renal function suggesting the possibility of renal tubular acidosis (RTA). On further evaluation of RTA, she had positive antinuclear antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-La antibodies. On nuclear scan of salivary glands, her left parotid gland was nonfunctional. Her parotid biopsy revealed dilated interlobular ducts engulfed by lymphoid cells. She also had autoimmune hypothyroidism as suggested by raised TSH and positive anti-TPO antibodies. At admission, her serum potassium levels were low and she was treated with intravenous potassium chloride. After she recovered from acute hypokalemic paralysis, she was started on oral potassium citrate along with phosphate supplements, hydroxychloroquine, oral prednisolone and thyroxine supplements. Over the next 6 months, she has significant reduction in the dosage of potassium, bicarbonate and phosphate and gained 3 kg of weight and 3.5 cm of height. As primary Sjogren syndrome itself is rare in pediatric population and its association with renal tubular acidosis is even rarer, we suggest considering Sjogren syndrome as a differential diagnosis during the RTA work-up is worth trying.

PMID: 28509102 [PubMed]

Videos
by Scott Harwood
17 views
by Abidemi Uruejoma
17 views
by Scott Harwood
17 views
Latest Research