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Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia : Overview
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Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a cancer of the lymphocytes that begins in the stem cells of the bone marrow and then invades the blood. The term "chronic" in chronic lymphocytic leukemia comes from the fact that it typically progresses more slowly than other types of leukemia. The term "lymphocytic" refer to the cells affected by the disease — a group of white blood cells called lymphocytes, which help your body fight infection. Overtime, CLL may also spread to the lymph nodes and other organs including the liver, spleen and lungs. It occurs when the stem cells that make lymphocytes become out of control and produce increasing amounts of abnormal lymphocytes (also called leukemic cells). Eventually, these abnormal cells replace normal lymphocytes and can crowd out other types of normal blood cells, leading to the features of the condition. CLL most commonly affects adults over age 45. There are treatments to help control the disease.

Bruce D. Cheson, MD, discuss Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, the most common form of leukemia on the United States. About Dr. Cheson: Bruce D. Cheson, MD, FACP, FAAAS, Georgetown University Hospital Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) is the nation's largest non-profit organization devoted to funding innovative research and providing people with lymphoma and healthcare professionals with up-to-date information about this type of cancer.

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