Close
Close
Filipa Rijo-Ferreira (UTSW): Circadian Rhythms of the African Sleeping Sickness Parasite (African Trypanosomiasis)
46 views
1.0
1.0 from 1 vote

Overview

African trypanosomiasis is also known as sleeping sickness and It is a parasitic disease of humans and other animals. There are two types of African trypanosomiasis, East and West, named for the region of Africa in which they were historically found. People can get the disease if they are bitten by an infected tsetse fly, which is only found in rural areas (Africa). Treatment is available for African trypanosomiasis, but it is fatal if left untreated.

Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that Trypanosoma brucei, the African sleeping sickness parasite, has circadian rhythms. Trypanosoma brucei acts by disturbing the circadian rhythms, and therefore the sleep, of its host. But does T. brucei also have circadian rhythms? Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that yes, the African sleeping sickness parasite does have circadian rhythms and that they that regulate its metabolism. She demonstrates that African sleeping sickness parasites have an intrinsic circadian clock that is independent of the host, and which regulates parasite biology throughout the day. This talk is part of the Young Scientist Seminars, a video series produced that features young scientists giving talks about their research and discoveries. Speaker Biography: Filipa Rijo-Ferreira received her bachelor’s degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology from Nova University of Lisbon. For her MSc she joined the laboratory of Dr. Charles Bangham at Imperial College London where she studied immunology and infection. As a graduate student at the University of Porto, she became fascinated with Molecular Parasitology and Circadian Rhythms, merging these two fields for her research. This was possible thanks to two very supportive scientists: her graduate mentor, Dr. Luisa Figueiredo, and her postdoctoral advisor, Dr. Joseph Takahashi. Filipa’s research aims to understand the daily host-parasite interactions, particularly, whether parasites have a molecular circadian clock that allows them to anticipate daily cycles. When not in the lab you can find Filipa sailing, reading at coffee shops or playing with her dog in the park

Learn more about:

Access Programs

by Abidemi Uruejoma
9 views 3 days ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
38 views 2 weeks ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
62 views 1 month ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
66 views 1 month ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
83 views 2 months ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
98 views 2 months ago
by Abidemi Uruejoma
98 views 2 months ago
1.0
1.0 from 1 vote
Free Newsletter
Find a Clinical Trial
Related Videos
by Dr. Jules Richard Kemadjou
8,801 views